The alt tag

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The alt tag

Podz
http://wordpress.org/support/topic/61228?replies=2#post-326996
Poster wants to use images as links. She can't see a way to add alt or
title attributes to the images and the lack of an alt tag means that WP
is outputting invalid xhtml.
Or are we both missing something ?

Having had a look at that page (mine is much abbreviated) in 2.0.1, it
would seem in need of an overhaul as I'm sure that's not changed in a
very long time.

P.
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Re: The alt tag

Jason Salaz
Podz wrote:

> http://wordpress.org/support/topic/61228?replies=2#post-326996
> Poster wants to use images as links. She can't see a way to add alt or
> title attributes to the images and the lack of an alt tag means that WP
> is outputting invalid xhtml.
> Or are we both missing something ?
>
> Having had a look at that page (mine is much abbreviated) in 2.0.1, it
> would seem in need of an overhaul as I'm sure that's not changed in a
> very long time.
>
> P.

I'm going to give my feedback, but I want other's to answer first.
If someone knows THAT MUCH about specifications and the like, it it
impossible for them to click the 'HTML' button in the toolbar and
manually enter in the alt tag?

I'm really REALLY not a big fan of image manipulation menus, especially
for something as little an alt tag.

If they know these things, surely they know how to edit HTML.

On the flip side, if undefined, wordpress probably should populate the
alt tag with the title specified in the image uploader.
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Re: The alt tag

Andy Skelton
On 2/15/06, Jason S. <[hidden email]> wrote:
> I'm going to give my feedback, but I want other's to answer first.
> If someone knows THAT MUCH about specifications and the like, it it
> impossible for them to click the 'HTML' button in the toolbar and
> manually enter in the alt tag?

Clarifying for Podz: she's adding links, not posting links.
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Re: The alt tag

Craig-16
In reply to this post by Jason Salaz
Jason said:
"On the flip side, if undefined, wordpress probably should populate the
alt tag with the title specified in the image uploader."

My preference would be simply empty quotes -- alt="" because semantically an
alt tag is not a title, it is information about the image. That is why there
is a title tag. :-)

Craig.
Nuclear Moose.
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Re: The alt tag

Podz
In reply to this post by Jason Salaz
Jason S. wrote:

> Podz wrote:
>> http://wordpress.org/support/topic/61228?replies=2#post-326996
>> Poster wants to use images as links. She can't see a way to add alt or
>> title attributes to the images and the lack of an alt tag means that WP
>> is outputting invalid xhtml.
>> Or are we both missing something ?
>>
>> Having had a look at that page (mine is much abbreviated) in 2.0.1, it
>> would seem in need of an overhaul as I'm sure that's not changed in a
>> very long time.
>>
>> P.
>
> I'm going to give my feedback, but I want other's to answer first.
> If someone knows THAT MUCH about specifications and the like, it it
> impossible for them to click the 'HTML' button in the toolbar and
> manually enter in the alt tag?
>

Sorry - I should have been clearer
Options > Links > Add Link

I've played more though and it's not that WP's code is off. It's that
the page in question is poor.

The 'Link Name' becomes the alt tag if an image is used.
The 'Short description' serves as both the title tag and the words that
appear under the link when output.
The 'Notes' does something ?

So right now with default calls, she can have images with a title and
the words underneath, or images but no titles. And the Name = alt tag
could do with clearing up ?

P.
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Re: The alt tag

Craig-16
In reply to this post by Craig-16
My response is not very clear, in retrospect, so I'm including a portion of
a CommuntyMX article written by Zoe Gillinwater:

Alt text should not *describe* the image, it should *replace* it.

The rule that deals with alt text in Section 508 is 1194.22 (a):

A text equivalent for every non-text element shall be provided (e.g., via
"alt", "longdesc", or in element content).

Source: Section
508<http://www.section508.gov/index.cfm?FuseAction=Content&ID=12#Web>

The WAI's Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 1.0 checkpoint that
deals with alt text is 1.1:

Provide a text equivalent for every non-text element (e.g., via "alt",
"longdesc", or in element content). *This includes*: images, graphical
representations of text (including symbols), image map regions, animations (
e.g., animated GIFs), applets and programmatic objects, ASCII art, frames,
scripts, images used as list bullets, spacers, graphical buttons, sounds
(played with or without user interaction), stand-alone audio files, audio
tracks of video, and video. [Priority 1]

Source: w3 <http://www.w3.org/TR/WCAG10/#tech-text-equivalent>

Both of these guidelines state that the alt text should be an equivalent,
not a description. In other words, the alt text should fulfill the same
function that the image does by presenting the message the image is supposed
to convey in a textual instead of visual way.

For instance, let's say you use an image of a magnifying glass as a link to
your search page. A description of this image would be "magnifying glass,"
but this text does not help a non-visual user deduce what the purpose of the
magnifying glass image is. Instead, adding "search" as the alt text
adequately describes the meaning or purpose of the image, rather than the
image itself. Similarly, if you use an image of an arrow as a link to the
full text of an article, use "read more about Article X" as the alt text
instead of "arrow."

Making sure that images have text equivalents rather than descriptions also
means it's unnecessary to include words such as "image of" in your alt text.
So, instead of using "Widget Company logo" as the alt text for your logo
image, just use "Widget Company." That's a good text equivalent for the logo
and is all the non-visual user needs. Similarly, for the picture of Widget
Number One on your page, just use "Widget Number One" as the alt text, not
"image of Widget Number One."

Providing good text equivalents instead of descriptions becomes more
difficult with more complicated graphics, such as photos. Again, think about
the message the image is supposed to be communicating to your users, rather
than what the image looks like.

Let's say your web page is selling dehumidifiers, and on the page you've
included a picture of mold to illustrate the dire consequences that could
arise if a customer does not buy your dehumidifier. You could describe this
image ("Black mold spores cover the lower portion of a wall and baseboard"),
but not only would this be rather gross, it would not convey the same
message to non-visual users that it does to visual users. Instead, put the
image's purpose as the content of the alt attribute. "Excess humidity can
lead to costly and unhealthy mold" might be better alt text, or "ABC
Dehumidifiers reduce the chances of unhealthy mold in your home."
Craig.


On 2/15/06, Craig <[hidden email]> wrote:

>
> Jason said:
> "On the flip side, if undefined, wordpress probably should populate the
> alt tag with the title specified in the image uploader."
>
> My preference would be simply empty quotes -- alt="" because semantically
> an alt tag is not a title, it is information about the image. That is why
> there is a title tag. :-)
>
> Craig.
> Nuclear Moose.
>
>
>
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