Discontinuing a plugin on WordPress.org

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Discontinuing a plugin on WordPress.org

Nikola Nikolov
Hi everyone,

I was working with a client that was using the Fundify WordPress theme,
which was powered by a combination of Fundify Crowdfunding(
https://wordpress.org/plugins/appthemer-crowdfunding/ ) and EDD.

I wanted to download the source of the plugin to my computer to easily
navigate through the codebase. On the plugin page they've added "(Moved)"
to the name of the plugin.
Once I extracted the archive, there was nothing but an empty .php file and
a readme.txt file.

My question in this case is - is this allowed and isn't that a terrible way
of discontinuing a plugin? What if someone updates the plugin and their
site stops working? Or someone installs the plugin and nothing happens...

Is there anything the WordPress.org plugins team can do about it?

Best regards,
Nikola
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Re: Discontinuing a plugin on WordPress.org

Martin Lazarov
Hi Nikola,

you can aways download previews versions:

http://downloads.wordpress.org/plugin/appthemer-crowdfunding.1.8.1.zip
insteat of http://downloads.wordpress.org/plugin/appthemer-crowdfunding.1.8.[2].zip

Martin

On Fri, Aug 8, 2014 at 2:36 PM, Nikola Nikolov <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Hi everyone,
>
> I was working with a client that was using the Fundify WordPress theme,
> which was powered by a combination of Fundify Crowdfunding(
> https://wordpress.org/plugins/appthemer-crowdfunding/ ) and EDD.
>
> I wanted to download the source of the plugin to my computer to easily
> navigate through the codebase. On the plugin page they've added "(Moved)"
> to the name of the plugin.
> Once I extracted the archive, there was nothing but an empty .php file and
> a readme.txt file.
>
> My question in this case is - is this allowed and isn't that a terrible way
> of discontinuing a plugin? What if someone updates the plugin and their
> site stops working? Or someone installs the plugin and nothing happens...
>
> Is there anything the WordPress.org plugins team can do about it?
>
> Best regards,
> Nikola
> _______________________________________________
> wp-hackers mailing list
> [hidden email]
> http://lists.automattic.com/mailman/listinfo/wp-hackers
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Re: Discontinuing a plugin on WordPress.org

Otto-19
In reply to this post by Nikola Nikolov
Yes, that is a terrible way to discontinue a plugin, but people do it
anyway. When we find them, we close them so that listing is removed.


-Otto


On Fri, Aug 8, 2014 at 6:36 AM, Nikola Nikolov <[hidden email]>
wrote:

> Hi everyone,
>
> I was working with a client that was using the Fundify WordPress theme,
> which was powered by a combination of Fundify Crowdfunding(
> https://wordpress.org/plugins/appthemer-crowdfunding/ ) and EDD.
>
> I wanted to download the source of the plugin to my computer to easily
> navigate through the codebase. On the plugin page they've added "(Moved)"
> to the name of the plugin.
> Once I extracted the archive, there was nothing but an empty .php file and
> a readme.txt file.
>
> My question in this case is - is this allowed and isn't that a terrible way
> of discontinuing a plugin? What if someone updates the plugin and their
> site stops working? Or someone installs the plugin and nothing happens...
>
> Is there anything the WordPress.org plugins team can do about it?
>
> Best regards,
> Nikola
> _______________________________________________
> wp-hackers mailing list
> [hidden email]
> http://lists.automattic.com/mailman/listinfo/wp-hackers
>
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Re: Discontinuing a plugin on WordPress.org

Nikola Nikolov
I'm aware that I can download the previous versions of the plugin(well most
users are probably not though), but the thing is that you shouldn't have to
do that.

Otto - I guess it's probably more headaches than it's worth, but what about
reverting the last commit(or just moving the code back to /trunk or the
stable tag) and changing the readme to state that the plugin is no longer
going to be supported.
You then revoke access to the plugin's repository(so that the authors can
no longer do the same thing).

Ultimately I think that if there's a list of plugins that are no longer
supported by their authors and are put up "for adoption" by other
developers everyone could benefit(not sure if that's fair/possible?). Yes,
you can just fork the plugin and upload it as a new one, but the users of
the old plugin probably won't be aware that there's a new version of the
plugin.

Anyway, just some thoughts.


On Fri, Aug 8, 2014 at 3:23 PM, Otto <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Yes, that is a terrible way to discontinue a plugin, but people do it
> anyway. When we find them, we close them so that listing is removed.
>
>
> -Otto
>
>
> On Fri, Aug 8, 2014 at 6:36 AM, Nikola Nikolov <[hidden email]>
> wrote:
>
> > Hi everyone,
> >
> > I was working with a client that was using the Fundify WordPress theme,
> > which was powered by a combination of Fundify Crowdfunding(
> > https://wordpress.org/plugins/appthemer-crowdfunding/ ) and EDD.
> >
> > I wanted to download the source of the plugin to my computer to easily
> > navigate through the codebase. On the plugin page they've added "(Moved)"
> > to the name of the plugin.
> > Once I extracted the archive, there was nothing but an empty .php file
> and
> > a readme.txt file.
> >
> > My question in this case is - is this allowed and isn't that a terrible
> way
> > of discontinuing a plugin? What if someone updates the plugin and their
> > site stops working? Or someone installs the plugin and nothing happens...
> >
> > Is there anything the WordPress.org plugins team can do about it?
> >
> > Best regards,
> > Nikola
> > _______________________________________________
> > wp-hackers mailing list
> > [hidden email]
> > http://lists.automattic.com/mailman/listinfo/wp-hackers
> >
> _______________________________________________
> wp-hackers mailing list
> [hidden email]
> http://lists.automattic.com/mailman/listinfo/wp-hackers
>
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Re: Discontinuing a plugin on WordPress.org

Otto-19
Well, it is their plugin. If they don't want to support it or have people
download it anymore, then I have no real problem with that. So removing the
listing is the best way to do that, as I see it. I don't think we should
revert it and force it to be available if they don't want it available
anymore.

If somebody wants to remove their own plugin from the listings, then we can
do that. Simply nulling it out and putting "moved" on it is a bad idea, but
just getting rid of the URL entirely is fine with me.

-Otto


On Fri, Aug 8, 2014 at 7:50 AM, Nikola Nikolov <[hidden email]>
wrote:

> I'm aware that I can download the previous versions of the plugin(well most
> users are probably not though), but the thing is that you shouldn't have to
> do that.
>
> Otto - I guess it's probably more headaches than it's worth, but what about
> reverting the last commit(or just moving the code back to /trunk or the
> stable tag) and changing the readme to state that the plugin is no longer
> going to be supported.
> You then revoke access to the plugin's repository(so that the authors can
> no longer do the same thing).
>
> Ultimately I think that if there's a list of plugins that are no longer
> supported by their authors and are put up "for adoption" by other
> developers everyone could benefit(not sure if that's fair/possible?). Yes,
> you can just fork the plugin and upload it as a new one, but the users of
> the old plugin probably won't be aware that there's a new version of the
> plugin.
>
> Anyway, just some thoughts.
>
>
> On Fri, Aug 8, 2014 at 3:23 PM, Otto <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> > Yes, that is a terrible way to discontinue a plugin, but people do it
> > anyway. When we find them, we close them so that listing is removed.
> >
> >
> > -Otto
> >
> >
> > On Fri, Aug 8, 2014 at 6:36 AM, Nikola Nikolov <[hidden email]>
> > wrote:
> >
> > > Hi everyone,
> > >
> > > I was working with a client that was using the Fundify WordPress theme,
> > > which was powered by a combination of Fundify Crowdfunding(
> > > https://wordpress.org/plugins/appthemer-crowdfunding/ ) and EDD.
> > >
> > > I wanted to download the source of the plugin to my computer to easily
> > > navigate through the codebase. On the plugin page they've added
> "(Moved)"
> > > to the name of the plugin.
> > > Once I extracted the archive, there was nothing but an empty .php file
> > and
> > > a readme.txt file.
> > >
> > > My question in this case is - is this allowed and isn't that a terrible
> > way
> > > of discontinuing a plugin? What if someone updates the plugin and their
> > > site stops working? Or someone installs the plugin and nothing
> happens...
> > >
> > > Is there anything the WordPress.org plugins team can do about it?
> > >
> > > Best regards,
> > > Nikola
> > > _______________________________________________
> > > wp-hackers mailing list
> > > [hidden email]
> > > http://lists.automattic.com/mailman/listinfo/wp-hackers
> > >
> > _______________________________________________
> > wp-hackers mailing list
> > [hidden email]
> > http://lists.automattic.com/mailman/listinfo/wp-hackers
> >
> _______________________________________________
> wp-hackers mailing list
> [hidden email]
> http://lists.automattic.com/mailman/listinfo/wp-hackers
>
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Re: Discontinuing a plugin on WordPress.org

Nikola Nikolov
That makes sense.


On Fri, Aug 8, 2014 at 3:55 PM, Otto <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Well, it is their plugin. If they don't want to support it or have people
> download it anymore, then I have no real problem with that. So removing the
> listing is the best way to do that, as I see it. I don't think we should
> revert it and force it to be available if they don't want it available
> anymore.
>
> If somebody wants to remove their own plugin from the listings, then we can
> do that. Simply nulling it out and putting "moved" on it is a bad idea, but
> just getting rid of the URL entirely is fine with me.
>
> -Otto
>
>
> On Fri, Aug 8, 2014 at 7:50 AM, Nikola Nikolov <[hidden email]>
> wrote:
>
> > I'm aware that I can download the previous versions of the plugin(well
> most
> > users are probably not though), but the thing is that you shouldn't have
> to
> > do that.
> >
> > Otto - I guess it's probably more headaches than it's worth, but what
> about
> > reverting the last commit(or just moving the code back to /trunk or the
> > stable tag) and changing the readme to state that the plugin is no longer
> > going to be supported.
> > You then revoke access to the plugin's repository(so that the authors can
> > no longer do the same thing).
> >
> > Ultimately I think that if there's a list of plugins that are no longer
> > supported by their authors and are put up "for adoption" by other
> > developers everyone could benefit(not sure if that's fair/possible?).
> Yes,
> > you can just fork the plugin and upload it as a new one, but the users of
> > the old plugin probably won't be aware that there's a new version of the
> > plugin.
> >
> > Anyway, just some thoughts.
> >
> >
> > On Fri, Aug 8, 2014 at 3:23 PM, Otto <[hidden email]> wrote:
> >
> > > Yes, that is a terrible way to discontinue a plugin, but people do it
> > > anyway. When we find them, we close them so that listing is removed.
> > >
> > >
> > > -Otto
> > >
> > >
> > > On Fri, Aug 8, 2014 at 6:36 AM, Nikola Nikolov <[hidden email]>
> > > wrote:
> > >
> > > > Hi everyone,
> > > >
> > > > I was working with a client that was using the Fundify WordPress
> theme,
> > > > which was powered by a combination of Fundify Crowdfunding(
> > > > https://wordpress.org/plugins/appthemer-crowdfunding/ ) and EDD.
> > > >
> > > > I wanted to download the source of the plugin to my computer to
> easily
> > > > navigate through the codebase. On the plugin page they've added
> > "(Moved)"
> > > > to the name of the plugin.
> > > > Once I extracted the archive, there was nothing but an empty .php
> file
> > > and
> > > > a readme.txt file.
> > > >
> > > > My question in this case is - is this allowed and isn't that a
> terrible
> > > way
> > > > of discontinuing a plugin? What if someone updates the plugin and
> their
> > > > site stops working? Or someone installs the plugin and nothing
> > happens...
> > > >
> > > > Is there anything the WordPress.org plugins team can do about it?
> > > >
> > > > Best regards,
> > > > Nikola
> > > > _______________________________________________
> > > > wp-hackers mailing list
> > > > [hidden email]
> > > > http://lists.automattic.com/mailman/listinfo/wp-hackers
> > > >
> > > _______________________________________________
> > > wp-hackers mailing list
> > > [hidden email]
> > > http://lists.automattic.com/mailman/listinfo/wp-hackers
> > >
> > _______________________________________________
> > wp-hackers mailing list
> > [hidden email]
> > http://lists.automattic.com/mailman/listinfo/wp-hackers
> >
> _______________________________________________
> wp-hackers mailing list
> [hidden email]
> http://lists.automattic.com/mailman/listinfo/wp-hackers
>
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Re: Discontinuing a plugin on WordPress.org

Ipstenu the Half-Elf
Among the reasons we don’t keep an official list of ‘plugins ready for adoption’ is that the plugin team doesn’t have the time, and any attempt to use a wiki would be easy to mess up by people listing plugins that are not ready to be taken over.

I say this a lot. If YOU have a plugin you want to stop working on, push an update that makes it clear on the plugin settings page, the plugin listing on the plugins.php page, AND in your readme for the wporg repo. Tell people “I’m not working on this anymore.” and if you’re inclined, give them a way to contact you to take it over.

Because y’know :) We’re cool with that!

Also remember we generally aren’t going to hand over your plugin to random people.

https://make.wordpress.org/plugins/2014/02/06/clarification-on-taking-over-plugins/

So keep your email address on WPORG valid and up to date, and do please whitelist plugins AT wordpress.org :D

--  
Mika A Epstein (aka Ipstenu)
http://ipstenu.org | http://halfelf.org

On August 8, 2014 at 5:57:40 AM, Nikola Nikolov ([hidden email]) wrote:

> That makes sense.
>  
>  
> On Fri, Aug 8, 2014 at 3:55 PM, Otto wrote:
>  
> > Well, it is their plugin. If they don't want to support it or have people
> > download it anymore, then I have no real problem with that. So removing the
> > listing is the best way to do that, as I see it. I don't think we should
> > revert it and force it to be available if they don't want it available
> > anymore.
> >
> > If somebody wants to remove their own plugin from the listings, then we can
> > do that. Simply nulling it out and putting "moved" on it is a bad idea, but
> > just getting rid of the URL entirely is fine with me.
> >
> > -Otto
> >
> >
> > On Fri, Aug 8, 2014 at 7:50 AM, Nikola Nikolov  
> > wrote:
> >
> > > I'm aware that I can download the previous versions of the plugin(well
> > most
> > > users are probably not though), but the thing is that you shouldn't have
> > to
> > > do that.
> > >
> > > Otto - I guess it's probably more headaches than it's worth, but what
> > about
> > > reverting the last commit(or just moving the code back to /trunk or the
> > > stable tag) and changing the readme to state that the plugin is no longer
> > > going to be supported.
> > > You then revoke access to the plugin's repository(so that the authors can
> > > no longer do the same thing).
> > >
> > > Ultimately I think that if there's a list of plugins that are no longer
> > > supported by their authors and are put up "for adoption" by other
> > > developers everyone could benefit(not sure if that's fair/possible?).
> > Yes,
> > > you can just fork the plugin and upload it as a new one, but the users of
> > > the old plugin probably won't be aware that there's a new version of the
> > > plugin.
> > >
> > > Anyway, just some thoughts.
> > >
> > >
> > > On Fri, Aug 8, 2014 at 3:23 PM, Otto wrote:
> > >
> > > > Yes, that is a terrible way to discontinue a plugin, but people do it
> > > > anyway. When we find them, we close them so that listing is removed.
> > > >
> > > >
> > > > -Otto
> > > >
> > > >
> > > > On Fri, Aug 8, 2014 at 6:36 AM, Nikola Nikolov  
> > > > wrote:
> > > >
> > > > > Hi everyone,
> > > > >
> > > > > I was working with a client that was using the Fundify WordPress
> > theme,
> > > > > which was powered by a combination of Fundify Crowdfunding(
> > > > > https://wordpress.org/plugins/appthemer-crowdfunding/ ) and EDD.
> > > > >
> > > > > I wanted to download the source of the plugin to my computer to
> > easily
> > > > > navigate through the codebase. On the plugin page they've added
> > > "(Moved)"
> > > > > to the name of the plugin.
> > > > > Once I extracted the archive, there was nothing but an empty .php
> > file
> > > > and
> > > > > a readme.txt file.
> > > > >
> > > > > My question in this case is - is this allowed and isn't that a
> > terrible
> > > > way
> > > > > of discontinuing a plugin? What if someone updates the plugin and
> > their
> > > > > site stops working? Or someone installs the plugin and nothing
> > > happens...
> > > > >
> > > > > Is there anything the WordPress.org plugins team can do about it?
> > > > >
> > > > > Best regards,
> > > > > Nikola
> > > > > _______________________________________________
> > > > > wp-hackers mailing list
> > > > > [hidden email]
> > > > > http://lists.automattic.com/mailman/listinfo/wp-hackers
> > > > >
> > > > _______________________________________________
> > > > wp-hackers mailing list
> > > > [hidden email]
> > > > http://lists.automattic.com/mailman/listinfo/wp-hackers
> > > >
> > > _______________________________________________
> > > wp-hackers mailing list
> > > [hidden email]
> > > http://lists.automattic.com/mailman/listinfo/wp-hackers
> > >
> > _______________________________________________
> > wp-hackers mailing list
> > [hidden email]
> > http://lists.automattic.com/mailman/listinfo/wp-hackers
> >
> _______________________________________________
> wp-hackers mailing list
> [hidden email]
> http://lists.automattic.com/mailman/listinfo/wp-hackers
>  

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Re: Discontinuing a plugin on WordPress.org

chriscct7
-- Please reply above this line --

-----------------------------------------------------------
## Chris replied, on Aug 8 @ 11:15am (AMT):

the issue is that there are a lot, probably thousands of users running
that plugin and by pushing an update that nulls it those site owners
are losing real money in a very big way. If they didn't want to
support it use the adopt me tag or something. The problem with
removing it from the listings IMO is that those users who we're
running it live need to have a way of getting the previous version
zip, and for most users the easiest way (other than reverting the
update) would e to grab the last version zip off the dev tab on the
listing.
--
Chris Christoff
[hidden email]
http://www.chriscct7.com [1]
@chriscct7
If you feel the need to donate, as a college student, I appreciate
donations of any amount. The easiest way to donate to my college fund
is via the donation button at the bottom of my
homepage: http://chriscct7.com/ [2]

Links:
------
[1] http://www.chriscct7.com
[2] http://chriscct7.com/


-----------------------------------------------------------
## [hidden email] replied, on Aug 8 @ 11:01am (AMT):

Among the reasons we don’t keep an official list of ‘plugins ready
for adoption’ is that the plugin team doesn’t have the time, and
any attempt to use a wiki would be easy to mess up by people listing
plugins that are not ready to be taken over.

 I say this a lot. If YOU have a plugin you want to stop working on,
push an update that makes it clear on the plugin settings page, the
plugin listing on the plugins.php page, AND in your readme for the
wporg repo. Tell people “I’m not working on this anymore.” and
if you’re inclined, give them a way to contact you to take it over.

 Because y’know :) We’re cool with that!

 Also remember we generally aren’t going to hand over your plugin to
random people.

 https://make.wordpress.org/plugins/2014/02/06/clarification-on-taking-over-plugins/
[1]

 So keep your email address on WPORG valid and up to date, and do
please whitelist plugins AT wordpress.org :D

 --
 Mika A Epstein (aka Ipstenu)
 http://ipstenu.org [2] | http://halfelf.org [3]

 _______________________________________________
 wp-hackers mailing list
 [hidden email] [4]
 http://lists.automattic.com/mailman/listinfo/wp-hackers [5]

Links:
------
[1]
https://make.wordpress.org/plugins/2014/02/06/clarification-on-taking-over-plugins/
[2] http://ipstenu.org
[3] http://halfelf.org
[4] mailto:[hidden email]
[5] http://lists.automattic.com/mailman/listinfo/wp-hackers


-----------------------------------------------------------
## [hidden email] replied, on Aug 8 @ 8:57am (AMT):

That makes sense.

 _______________________________________________
 wp-hackers mailing list
 [hidden email] [1]
 http://lists.automattic.com/mailman/listinfo/wp-hackers [2]

Links:
------
[1] mailto:[hidden email]
[2] http://lists.automattic.com/mailman/listinfo/wp-hackers


-----------------------------------------------------------
## [hidden email] replied, on Aug 8 @ 8:56am (AMT):

Well, it is their plugin. If they don't want to support it or have
people
 download it anymore, then I have no real problem with that. So
removing the
 listing is the best way to do that, as I see it. I don't think we
should
 revert it and force it to be available if they don't want it
available
 anymore.

 If somebody wants to remove their own plugin from the listings, then
we can
 do that. Simply nulling it out and putting "moved" on it is a bad
idea, but
 just getting rid of the URL entirely is fine with me.

 -Otto

 wrote:

 _______________________________________________
 wp-hackers mailing list
 [hidden email] [1]
 http://lists.automattic.com/mailman/listinfo/wp-hackers [2]

Links:
------
[1] mailto:[hidden email]
[2] http://lists.automattic.com/mailman/listinfo/wp-hackers


-----------------------------------------------------------
## [hidden email] replied, on Aug 8 @ 8:51am (AMT):

I'm aware that I can download the previous versions of the plugin(well
most
 users are probably not though), but the thing is that you shouldn't
have to
 do that.

 Otto - I guess it's probably more headaches than it's worth, but what
about
 reverting the last commit(or just moving the code back to /trunk or
the
 stable tag) and changing the readme to state that the plugin is no
longer
 going to be supported.
 You then revoke access to the plugin's repository(so that the authors
can
 no longer do the same thing).

 Ultimately I think that if there's a list of plugins that are no
longer
 supported by their authors and are put up "for adoption" by other
 developers everyone could benefit(not sure if that's fair/possible?).
Yes,
 you can just fork the plugin and upload it as a new one, but the
users of
 the old plugin probably won't be aware that there's a new version of
the
 plugin.

 Anyway, just some thoughts.

 > Yes, that is a terrible way to discontinue a plugin, but people
do it
 > anyway. When we find them, we close them so that listing is
removed.
 >
 >
 > -Otto
 >
 >
 >
 > > Hi everyone,
 > >
 > > I was working with a client that was using the Fundify
WordPress theme,
 > > which was powered by a combination of Fundify
Crowdfunding(
 > > https://wordpress.org/plugins/appthemer-crowdfunding/ [1]
) and EDD.
 > >
 > > I wanted to download the source of the plugin to my
computer to easily
 > > navigate through the codebase. On the plugin page they've
added "(Moved)"
 > > to the name of the plugin.
 > > Once I extracted the archive, there was nothing but an
empty .php file
 > and
 > > a readme.txt file.
 > >
 > > My question in this case is - is this allowed and isn't
that a terrible
 > way
 > > of discontinuing a plugin? What if someone updates the
plugin and their
 > > site stops working? Or someone installs the plugin and
nothing happens...
 > >
 > > Is there anything the WordPress.org plugins team can do
about it?
 > >
 > > Best regards,
 > > Nikola
 > > _______________________________________________
 > > wp-hackers mailing list
 > > [hidden email] [2]
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## [hidden email] replied, on Aug 8 @ 8:24am (AMT):

Yes, that is a terrible way to discontinue a plugin, but people do it
 anyway. When we find them, we close them so that listing is removed.

 -Otto

 wrote:

 > Hi everyone,
 >
 > I was working with a client that was using the Fundify
WordPress theme,
 > which was powered by a combination of Fundify Crowdfunding(
 > https://wordpress.org/plugins/appthemer-crowdfunding/ [1] ) and
EDD.
 >
 > I wanted to download the source of the plugin to my computer to
easily
 > navigate through the codebase. On the plugin page they've added
"(Moved)"
 > to the name of the plugin.
 > Once I extracted the archive, there was nothing but an empty
.php file and
 > a readme.txt file.
 >
 > My question in this case is - is this allowed and isn't that a
terrible way
 > of discontinuing a plugin? What if someone updates the plugin
and their
 > site stops working? Or someone installs the plugin and nothing
happens...
 >
 > Is there anything the WordPress.org plugins team can do about
it?
 >
 > Best regards,
 > Nikola
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Re: Discontinuing a plugin on WordPress.org

Otto-19
In reply to this post by Nikola Nikolov
On Fri, Aug 8, 2014 at 7:50 AM, Nikola Nikolov <[hidden email]>
wrote:

> Ultimately I think that if there's a list of plugins that are no longer
> supported by their authors and are put up "for adoption" by other
> developers everyone could benefit(not sure if that's fair/possible?). Yes,
> you can just fork the plugin and upload it as a new one, but the users of
> the old plugin probably won't be aware that there's a new version of the
> plugin.
>

LOL. Honestly, every time the issue of adoption comes up for plugins, I
can't help but laugh a bit. :)

Plugin adoption is not a real issue, because there is nobody out there
actually wanting to adopt other people's code.

Seriously, nobody wants to do it. People keep asking why there is no
"for-adoption" list, and the answer is simply because it is not necessary.
There's no shortage of abandoned plugins, but there's a serious shortage of
caring wanna-be-parents for those plugins.

I can think of maybe 10 times that a plugin has been adopted. Total. Ever.
It just doesn't come up that often. The whole thing is a total non-issue
because the truth of the matter is that no coder really wants to take over
somebody else's code. It's a lot more fun to write your own code instead.
And when you're doing things for free, "fun" is your primary purpose.

If anybody wants to adopt a plugin and cannot get in touch with the author,
you can email the plugins team and they will facilitate the process or make
contact or whatever. But this virtually never happens. There's no need for
a list because it's not like we're swamped with requests or anything.

-Otto
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Re: Discontinuing a plugin on WordPress.org

chriscct7
-- Please reply above this line --

-----------------------------------------------------------
## Chris replied, on Aug 8 @ 11:23am (AMT):

It depends on the plugin. Given the one in question was used by a lot
of people and is a mandatory plugin for several themes not written by
that developer there would probably be a very high chance this one
would be adopted if allowed
--
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[hidden email]
http://www.chriscct7.com [1]
@chriscct7
If you feel the need to donate, as a college student, I appreciate
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## [hidden email] replied, on Aug 8 @ 11:19am (AMT):

wrote:

 > Ultimately I think that if there's a list of plugins that are
no longer
 > supported by their authors and are put up "for adoption" by
other
 > developers everyone could benefit(not sure if that's
fair/possible?). Yes,
 > you can just fork the plugin and upload it as a new one, but
the users of
 > the old plugin probably won't be aware that there's a new
version of the
 > plugin.
 >

 LOL. Honestly, every time the issue of adoption comes up for plugins,
I
 can't help but laugh a bit. :)

 Plugin adoption is not a real issue, because there is nobody out
there
 actually wanting to adopt other people's code.

 Seriously, nobody wants to do it. People keep asking why there is no
 "for-adoption" list, and the answer is simply because it is not
necessary.
 There's no shortage of abandoned plugins, but there's a serious
shortage of
 caring wanna-be-parents for those plugins.

 I can think of maybe 10 times that a plugin has been adopted. Total.
Ever.
 It just doesn't come up that often. The whole thing is a total
non-issue
 because the truth of the matter is that no coder really wants to take
over
 somebody else's code. It's a lot more fun to write your own code
instead.
 And when you're doing things for free, "fun" is your primary purpose.

 If anybody wants to adopt a plugin and cannot get in touch with the
author,
 you can email the plugins team and they will facilitate the process
or make
 contact or whatever. But this virtually never happens. There's no
need for
 a list because it's not like we're swamped with requests or anything.

 -Otto
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## Chris replied, on Aug 8 @ 11:15am (AMT):

the issue is that there are a lot, probably thousands of users running
that plugin and by pushing an update that nulls it those site owners
are losing real money in a very big way. If they didn't want to
support it use the adopt me tag or something. The problem with
removing it from the listings IMO is that those users who we're
running it live need to have a way of getting the previous version
zip, and for most users the easiest way (other than reverting the
update) would e to grab the last version zip off the dev tab on the
listing.
--
Chris Christoff
[hidden email]
http://www.chriscct7.com [1]
@chriscct7
If you feel the need to donate, as a college student, I appreciate
donations of any amount. The easiest way to donate to my college fund
is via the donation button at the bottom of my
homepage: http://chriscct7.com/ [2]

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-----------------------------------------------------------
## [hidden email] replied, on Aug 8 @ 11:01am (AMT):

Among the reasons we don’t keep an official list of ‘plugins ready
for adoption’ is that the plugin team doesn’t have the time, and
any attempt to use a wiki would be easy to mess up by people listing
plugins that are not ready to be taken over.

 I say this a lot. If YOU have a plugin you want to stop working on,
push an update that makes it clear on the plugin settings page, the
plugin listing on the plugins.php page, AND in your readme for the
wporg repo. Tell people “I’m not working on this anymore.” and
if you’re inclined, give them a way to contact you to take it over.

 Because y’know :) We’re cool with that!

 Also remember we generally aren’t going to hand over your plugin to
random people.

 https://make.wordpress.org/plugins/2014/02/06/clarification-on-taking-over-plugins/
[1]

 So keep your email address on WPORG valid and up to date, and do
please whitelist plugins AT wordpress.org :D

 --
 Mika A Epstein (aka Ipstenu)
 http://ipstenu.org [2] | http://halfelf.org [3]

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## [hidden email] replied, on Aug 8 @ 8:57am (AMT):

That makes sense.

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## [hidden email] replied, on Aug 8 @ 8:56am (AMT):

Well, it is their plugin. If they don't want to support it or have
people
 download it anymore, then I have no real problem with that. So
removing the
 listing is the best way to do that, as I see it. I don't think we
should
 revert it and force it to be available if they don't want it
available
 anymore.

 If somebody wants to remove their own plugin from the listings, then
we can
 do that. Simply nulling it out and putting "moved" on it is a bad
idea, but
 just getting rid of the URL entirely is fine with me.

 -Otto

 wrote:

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Re: Discontinuing a plugin on WordPress.org

Chip Bennett
In reply to this post by Otto-19
I have "adopted" three Plugins (one of which - thankfully - the primary
development was taken back over by the original developer). But what Otto
said is entirely correct: if someone wants to adopt a Plugin, just contact
the developer. From there, it's a simple matter of the developer entering
your WPORG username in the correct field on the Plugin's Admin page in the
Plugin Directory.

On a related note: I forked a Plugin a long time ago, and eventually, that
Plugin's functionality was entirely superseded by core functionality. The
Plugin had tens of thousands of downloads, so I couldn't simply stop
maintaining it, or blanking out the latest version in SVN. Instead, I added
information to the readme.txt explaining why the Plugin's functionality was
no longer necessary, then in a later version, I gracefully backed out the
Plugin's hooks, then in a much later version, removed the no-longer-hooked
Plugin functions:

http://wordpress.org/plugins/cbnet-ping-optimizer/

I had thought about asking the Plugin team to remove it, but since I still
see quite a bit of misinformation about the Plugin's necessity from time to
time, it seems to be more beneficial to leave it as-is.

So, that might be an approach worth taking for the OP's Plugin.


On Fri, Aug 8, 2014 at 10:18 AM, Otto <[hidden email]> wrote:

> On Fri, Aug 8, 2014 at 7:50 AM, Nikola Nikolov <[hidden email]>
> wrote:
>
> > Ultimately I think that if there's a list of plugins that are no longer
> > supported by their authors and are put up "for adoption" by other
> > developers everyone could benefit(not sure if that's fair/possible?).
> Yes,
> > you can just fork the plugin and upload it as a new one, but the users of
> > the old plugin probably won't be aware that there's a new version of the
> > plugin.
> >
>
> LOL. Honestly, every time the issue of adoption comes up for plugins, I
> can't help but laugh a bit. :)
>
> Plugin adoption is not a real issue, because there is nobody out there
> actually wanting to adopt other people's code.
>
> Seriously, nobody wants to do it. People keep asking why there is no
> "for-adoption" list, and the answer is simply because it is not necessary.
> There's no shortage of abandoned plugins, but there's a serious shortage of
> caring wanna-be-parents for those plugins.
>
> I can think of maybe 10 times that a plugin has been adopted. Total. Ever.
> It just doesn't come up that often. The whole thing is a total non-issue
> because the truth of the matter is that no coder really wants to take over
> somebody else's code. It's a lot more fun to write your own code instead.
> And when you're doing things for free, "fun" is your primary purpose.
>
> If anybody wants to adopt a plugin and cannot get in touch with the author,
> you can email the plugins team and they will facilitate the process or make
> contact or whatever. But this virtually never happens. There's no need for
> a list because it's not like we're swamped with requests or anything.
>
> -Otto
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Re: Discontinuing a plugin on WordPress.org

Ipstenu the Half-Elf
As a reminder, if we ‘remove’ your plugin, it just means not’s not going to be listed in WPORG anymore. You can still check in SVN code and all that. So in this case, Chip, closing the plugin would prevent anyone new from using it, while leaving your support forum intact. I’d probably do that since it’s not needed anymore.

Just ping us at plugins AT wordpress.org and let us know :)

(There’s also a way to disable the plugin, so you can push updates while not allowing new people to download, which is also a good idea to do WHILE you’re backing it out)

--  
Mika A Epstein (aka Ipstenu)
http://ipstenu.org | http://halfelf.org

On August 8, 2014 at 9:09:07 AM, Chip Bennett ([hidden email]) wrote:
>  
> http://wordpress.org/plugins/cbnet-ping-optimizer/
>  
> I had thought about asking the Plugin team to remove it, but since I still
> see quite a bit of misinformation about the Plugin's necessity from time to
> time, it seems to be more beneficial to leave it as-is.
>  
> So, that might be an approach worth taking for the OP's Plugin.

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Re: Discontinuing a plugin on WordPress.org

Nikola Nikolov
Tons of great information on the subject - thanks everyone!

Otto - it's true that usually no one likes working on other people's
code(yuk!), but Chris is right I think - this is a pretty popular plugin
and I'm assuming there would have been someone interested in adopting the
plugin.


On Fri, Aug 8, 2014 at 7:35 PM, Half-Elf on Tech <[hidden email]>
wrote:

> As a reminder, if we ‘remove’ your plugin, it just means not’s not going
> to be listed in WPORG anymore. You can still check in SVN code and all
> that. So in this case, Chip, closing the plugin would prevent anyone new
> from using it, while leaving your support forum intact. I’d probably do
> that since it’s not needed anymore.
>
> Just ping us at plugins AT wordpress.org and let us know :)
>
> (There’s also a way to disable the plugin, so you can push updates while
> not allowing new people to download, which is also a good idea to do WHILE
> you’re backing it out)
>
> --
> Mika A Epstein (aka Ipstenu)
> http://ipstenu.org | http://halfelf.org
>
> On August 8, 2014 at 9:09:07 AM, Chip Bennett ([hidden email])
> wrote:
> >
> > http://wordpress.org/plugins/cbnet-ping-optimizer/
> >
> > I had thought about asking the Plugin team to remove it, but since I
> still
> > see quite a bit of misinformation about the Plugin's necessity from time
> to
> > time, it seems to be more beneficial to leave it as-is.
> >
> > So, that might be an approach worth taking for the OP's Plugin.
>
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Re: Discontinuing a plugin on WordPress.org

BjornW
In reply to this post by Nikola Nikolov
Hi,

For those of you looking for the Crowdfunding plugin sourcecode. I added
this to my Github repos a few months back. The last commit from the
original repo was from 23rd april. If anyone has a newer version, let me
know, but for now you'll at least have access to the sourcecode.

https://github.com/BjornW/crowdfunding

ps: I'm not planning to maintain this plugin, just sharing it as a
courtesy to fellow developers.

On 08/08/2014 01:36 PM, Nikola Nikolov wrote:

> Hi everyone,
>
> I was working with a client that was using the Fundify WordPress theme,
> which was powered by a combination of Fundify Crowdfunding(
> https://wordpress.org/plugins/appthemer-crowdfunding/ ) and EDD.
>
> I wanted to download the source of the plugin to my computer to easily
> navigate through the codebase. On the plugin page they've added "(Moved)"
> to the name of the plugin.
> Once I extracted the archive, there was nothing but an empty .php file and
> a readme.txt file.
>
> My question in this case is - is this allowed and isn't that a terrible way
> of discontinuing a plugin? What if someone updates the plugin and their
> site stops working? Or someone installs the plugin and nothing happens...
>
> Is there anything the WordPress.org plugins team can do about it?
>
> Best regards,
> Nikola
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